Presentation Type

Poster

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Catherine Off & Jenna Griffin

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Speech Language and Hearing Sciences

Abstract

Title: Quality of Life in Stroke Survivors with Aphasia who Participate in an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program (ICAP)

Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study is to investigate the impact that participation in an ICAP has on quality of life for stroke survivors with aphasia, as measured by the Assessment of Living with Aphasia (ALA) and the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB).

Methods: Participants include eight stroke survivors with aphasia and their family caregivers who participated in the summer 2018 intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP) at the University of Montana. Prior to and immediately following treatment, all participants underwent comprehensive cognitive-linguistic and psychosocial evaluation. The ICAP included 4.5 hours of treatment per day, 4 days per week, for 4 weeks. The ICAP treatment included individual, group, and technology-based speech, language and cognitive therapy sessions, recreational outings, and home programming. Family caregiver education sessions were provided once per week, and family caregiver group counseling sessions occurred twice weekly. To assess the impact of the ICAP on quality of life, pre- and post-treatment scores of the ALA and CPIB are currently being analyzed.

Significance: The significance of this project is multifaceted. The ICAP treatment model is relatively unexamined, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide. This ICAP is unique as it is the only ICAP with an interdisciplinary collaboration between speech-language pathologists and family counselors. Understanding how the ICAP influences quality of life for the stroke survivor with aphasia has significant implications for long-term recovery and well-being.

Category

Social Sciences

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Apr 17th, 3:00 PM Apr 17th, 4:00 PM

Communicative Quality of Life for Stroke Survivors with Aphasia who participated in an Intensive Aphasia Program (ICAP)

UC South Ballroom

Title: Quality of Life in Stroke Survivors with Aphasia who Participate in an Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program (ICAP)

Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study is to investigate the impact that participation in an ICAP has on quality of life for stroke survivors with aphasia, as measured by the Assessment of Living with Aphasia (ALA) and the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB).

Methods: Participants include eight stroke survivors with aphasia and their family caregivers who participated in the summer 2018 intensive comprehensive aphasia program (ICAP) at the University of Montana. Prior to and immediately following treatment, all participants underwent comprehensive cognitive-linguistic and psychosocial evaluation. The ICAP included 4.5 hours of treatment per day, 4 days per week, for 4 weeks. The ICAP treatment included individual, group, and technology-based speech, language and cognitive therapy sessions, recreational outings, and home programming. Family caregiver education sessions were provided once per week, and family caregiver group counseling sessions occurred twice weekly. To assess the impact of the ICAP on quality of life, pre- and post-treatment scores of the ALA and CPIB are currently being analyzed.

Significance: The significance of this project is multifaceted. The ICAP treatment model is relatively unexamined, with approximately 12-15 ICAPS existing worldwide. This ICAP is unique as it is the only ICAP with an interdisciplinary collaboration between speech-language pathologists and family counselors. Understanding how the ICAP influences quality of life for the stroke survivor with aphasia has significant implications for long-term recovery and well-being.