Graduation Year

2017

Graduation Month

May

Document Type

Thesis

Faculty Mentor

Stephen Yoshimura

Faculty Mentor Department

Communication Studies

Abstract

Individuals across the globe do not relate historic migration patterns with current conflicts, which is a problem that encompasses both historic and current migrations. Ironically, individuals who likely descend from immigrants themselves may highlight differences rather than similarities among newcomers while perceiving them as outsiders, and perhaps even exhibiting discrimination toward them. Our group sought to provide an international and historic perspective about migration by paralleling the issues that immigrants --specifically refugees-- face while encouraging individuals to look inward at their own family’s migratory roots. This was accomplished through a three-pronged approach: (1) obtaining profiles of historic and modern ‘refugees’; (2) hosting two interactive simulations in which participants experience an emotional understanding of the refugee struggle; and (3) disseminating accurate information to simulation participants. The figure below provides an overview of the problem, solution, and global implication of our project.

Honors College Research Project

No

GLI Capstone Project

yes

Share

COinS
 

© Copyright 2017 Ian Strahn, Kurt Nickolas Secrest, Mckennah Andrews, Jessie Seiler, Emily Eaton, and Erika Hidem