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Presentation

Abstract

The start of the Cold War saw a change in both US international policy and American cinematic content. There was a sudden rise of Russians as the enemy, a trend which continues until this day. Despite a plethora of countries, American films again and again rely on Russian caricatures to fill their villainous roles. The rare difference in Hollywood stereotypes comes from American television, in which Russians are occasionally developed beyond simple villains or one-note characters. The demonization of Russians can be contributed to the forever-tense relationships between America and Russia, which date back to the Cold War, as well as the lack of racial tension that can arise from such a depiction. While the depiction of other countries (such as China, Iran, etc.) has elicited criticism on the basis of racism, the whiteness of the Russian population and the internalized hatred between the US and former USSR prevents such kind of protests.

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Social Sciences

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Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 9:20 AM

Ruskis in Hollywood

The start of the Cold War saw a change in both US international policy and American cinematic content. There was a sudden rise of Russians as the enemy, a trend which continues until this day. Despite a plethora of countries, American films again and again rely on Russian caricatures to fill their villainous roles. The rare difference in Hollywood stereotypes comes from American television, in which Russians are occasionally developed beyond simple villains or one-note characters. The demonization of Russians can be contributed to the forever-tense relationships between America and Russia, which date back to the Cold War, as well as the lack of racial tension that can arise from such a depiction. While the depiction of other countries (such as China, Iran, etc.) has elicited criticism on the basis of racism, the whiteness of the Russian population and the internalized hatred between the US and former USSR prevents such kind of protests.