Title

Auditory evoked potentials in humans and laboratory rats

Presentation Type

Poster

Abstract

Evoked potentials provide a basis for the objective analysis of the auditory system. An animal model of hearing is very useful for studying untoward effects of drug therapy, toxic substances and noise-induced hearing loss. The Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) can be recorded using surface electrodes from lower animals and humans. The morphology of the ABR has been shown to correlate well with structures of the auditory pathway. This research compares the results of the human ABR with that of rat responses. A specially designed software program allowed concurrent ABR responses. This program will be discussed as well as the method for obtaining rat ABR’s. The concurrent responses were designed to provide a reliability index that was utilized to improve the determination of auditory thresholds. The stimuli were pure tones with a Blackman envelope. The Blackman envelope provides a minimal amount of spurious signals for brief stimuli (2 msec). A complete auditory threshold for all octave frequencies can be obtained in less than one hour.

Category

Life Sciences

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 3:00 PM Apr 15th, 4:00 PM

Auditory evoked potentials in humans and laboratory rats

Evoked potentials provide a basis for the objective analysis of the auditory system. An animal model of hearing is very useful for studying untoward effects of drug therapy, toxic substances and noise-induced hearing loss. The Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) can be recorded using surface electrodes from lower animals and humans. The morphology of the ABR has been shown to correlate well with structures of the auditory pathway. This research compares the results of the human ABR with that of rat responses. A specially designed software program allowed concurrent ABR responses. This program will be discussed as well as the method for obtaining rat ABR’s. The concurrent responses were designed to provide a reliability index that was utilized to improve the determination of auditory thresholds. The stimuli were pure tones with a Blackman envelope. The Blackman envelope provides a minimal amount of spurious signals for brief stimuli (2 msec). A complete auditory threshold for all octave frequencies can be obtained in less than one hour.