Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Category

STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)

Abstract/Artist Statement

Background and Purpose: Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) invariably experience functional decline in a number of motor and non-motor domains affecting posture, balance and gait. Numerous clinical studies have examined effects of various types of exercise on motor and non-motor problems. But still much gap remains in our understanding of various therapies and its effect on delaying or slowing the dopamine neuron degeneration. Recently Tai Chi and Yoga both are gaining popularity as Complementary Therapies, since both have components for mind and body control. The aim of this study was to determine whether 8 weeks of home-based Tai Chi or Yoga was more effective than regular balance exercises on functional balance and mobility.

Methods: Twenty-seven individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (Modified Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.5-3) were randomly assigned to either Tai Chi, Yoga or Conventional exercise group. All the participants were evaluated for Functional Balance and Mobility using Berg Balance Scale, Timed Ten Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test before and after eight weeks training.

Results: The results were analyzed using Two-way mixed ANOVA which showed that there was significant main effect for time as F (1,24)=74.18, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.76 for overall balance in Berg Balance Scale. There was also significant main effect of time on mobility overall as F(1,24)=77.78, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.76 in Timed up and Go test and F(1,24)=48.24, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.67 for Ten Metre walk test. There was significant interaction effect for time × group with F (2,24)=8.67, p=0.001, ƞ𝑝2=0.420 for balance. With respect to mobility the values F (2,24)=5.92, p=0.008, ƞ𝑝2=0.330 in Timed Up and Go test and F(2,24)=10.40, p=0.001, ƞ𝑝2=0.464 in Ten-meter walk test showed a significant interaction. But there was no significant main effect between the groups for both balance and mobility.

Conclusion: The findings of this study suggests that Tai Chi as well as Yoga are well adhered and are attractive options for a home-based setting. As any form of physical activity is considered beneficial for individuals with PD either Tai Chi, Yoga or conventional balance exercises could be used as therapeutic intervention to optimize balance and mobility. Further studies are necessary to understand the mind-body benefits of Tai Chi and Yoga either as multicomponent physical activity or as individual therapy in various stages of Parkinson’s Disease.

Personal Statement

I strongly believe in the process of research and innovation is the best way to transform lives. New ways and methods can bring difference in quality of life of the population. My work gives an insight of my take on improving the life of elderly with non curable disease: Parkinson's disease.

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Effect of home-based Tai Chi, Yoga or conventional balance exercise on functional balance and mobility among persons with idiopathic Parkinson's disease: An experimental study

Background and Purpose: Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) invariably experience functional decline in a number of motor and non-motor domains affecting posture, balance and gait. Numerous clinical studies have examined effects of various types of exercise on motor and non-motor problems. But still much gap remains in our understanding of various therapies and its effect on delaying or slowing the dopamine neuron degeneration. Recently Tai Chi and Yoga both are gaining popularity as Complementary Therapies, since both have components for mind and body control. The aim of this study was to determine whether 8 weeks of home-based Tai Chi or Yoga was more effective than regular balance exercises on functional balance and mobility.

Methods: Twenty-seven individuals with Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (Modified Hoehn and Yahr stage 2.5-3) were randomly assigned to either Tai Chi, Yoga or Conventional exercise group. All the participants were evaluated for Functional Balance and Mobility using Berg Balance Scale, Timed Ten Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test before and after eight weeks training.

Results: The results were analyzed using Two-way mixed ANOVA which showed that there was significant main effect for time as F (1,24)=74.18, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.76 for overall balance in Berg Balance Scale. There was also significant main effect of time on mobility overall as F(1,24)=77.78, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.76 in Timed up and Go test and F(1,24)=48.24, p=0.000, ƞ𝑝2=0.67 for Ten Metre walk test. There was significant interaction effect for time × group with F (2,24)=8.67, p=0.001, ƞ𝑝2=0.420 for balance. With respect to mobility the values F (2,24)=5.92, p=0.008, ƞ𝑝2=0.330 in Timed Up and Go test and F(2,24)=10.40, p=0.001, ƞ𝑝2=0.464 in Ten-meter walk test showed a significant interaction. But there was no significant main effect between the groups for both balance and mobility.

Conclusion: The findings of this study suggests that Tai Chi as well as Yoga are well adhered and are attractive options for a home-based setting. As any form of physical activity is considered beneficial for individuals with PD either Tai Chi, Yoga or conventional balance exercises could be used as therapeutic intervention to optimize balance and mobility. Further studies are necessary to understand the mind-body benefits of Tai Chi and Yoga either as multicomponent physical activity or as individual therapy in various stages of Parkinson’s Disease.