Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Category

STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics)

Abstract/Artist Statement

Reliability of Urge-to-Cough (UTC) Testing Abstract Researchers who study chronic cough rely on multiple measures to gauge if an intervention is working to reduce coughing. An assessment called Urge-to-Cough (UTC) testing has been proposed to determine a patient’s sensitivity to stimuli that commonly trigger coughing in patients with cough hypersensitivity (e.g., strong scents, projecting the voice). If reliable, UTC testing can be used in clinical and research scenarios to determine if a patient’s cough sensitivity is changing in response to an intervention. In this study, up to 25 patients referred for a chronic cough evaluation with a speech-language pathologist will be recruited. Participants will complete UTC testing during two separate sessions before beginning cough therapy. Patients will be exposed to safe stimuli for up to 15 seconds (e.g. smelling perfume or household cleaning products) and will complete vocal tasks (e.g. reading out loud). After performing each task, patients will rate their “urge-to-cough” sensation (i.e. the perceived strength of the feeling that they need to cough) using a 10-point Likert scale. The researchers will record the reported UTC as well as the number of coughs produced in association with the trial. Results from the two testing opportunities will be analyzed to determine the reliability of UTC Testing. We hypothesize UTC testing is a reliable assessment of a patient’s cough sensitivity and is therefore a useful clinical and research tool. Keywords: chronic cough; Urge-to-Cough; reliability

Mentor Name

Laurie Slovarp

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Reliability of Urge-to-Cough (UTC) Testing

Reliability of Urge-to-Cough (UTC) Testing Abstract Researchers who study chronic cough rely on multiple measures to gauge if an intervention is working to reduce coughing. An assessment called Urge-to-Cough (UTC) testing has been proposed to determine a patient’s sensitivity to stimuli that commonly trigger coughing in patients with cough hypersensitivity (e.g., strong scents, projecting the voice). If reliable, UTC testing can be used in clinical and research scenarios to determine if a patient’s cough sensitivity is changing in response to an intervention. In this study, up to 25 patients referred for a chronic cough evaluation with a speech-language pathologist will be recruited. Participants will complete UTC testing during two separate sessions before beginning cough therapy. Patients will be exposed to safe stimuli for up to 15 seconds (e.g. smelling perfume or household cleaning products) and will complete vocal tasks (e.g. reading out loud). After performing each task, patients will rate their “urge-to-cough” sensation (i.e. the perceived strength of the feeling that they need to cough) using a 10-point Likert scale. The researchers will record the reported UTC as well as the number of coughs produced in association with the trial. Results from the two testing opportunities will be analyzed to determine the reliability of UTC Testing. We hypothesize UTC testing is a reliable assessment of a patient’s cough sensitivity and is therefore a useful clinical and research tool. Keywords: chronic cough; Urge-to-Cough; reliability