Presentation Type

Presentation

Faculty Mentor’s Full Name

Laurie Minns

Faculty Mentor’s Department

Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Arthritis describes a group of chronic diseases that includes over 100 separate diagnoses, the pathologies of which affect primarily joints and surrounding joint tissue. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that as soon as the year 2040, the number of U.S. adults diagnosed with arthritis will reach 78 million. Osteoarthritis, gout, and rheumatoid arthritis are the most common forms of arthritis; each can lead to permanent and debilitating joint damage, especially within aging populations. It is possible to find evidence of arthritic pathogenesis within the joints of living and cadaveric specimens alike. Here the joint health of a 92-year-old female cadaver is discussed. Several synovial joints of the cadaveric specimen were carefully dissected using both sharp and blunt dissection techniques. Joint cavities at various locations of the hands and feet were opened, and articular surfaces were examined and assessed for evidence of arthritic pathology. Unsurprisingly, signs of osteoarthritis were present in several joints; indications of gouty arthritis were evident in the foot. General loss of articular cartilage, hardening of articular surfaces, and osteophyte formation were noted. Approval to conduct this study was given by the Montana Body Donation Program at Montana State University, and University of Montana IRB approval was not required, as cadavers are not considered human subjects for research purposes. With the size of the aging population in the United States reaching an all-time high, diseases that affect this populace will come to the forefront of healthcare. It is projected that arthritis will affect 26% of American adults by the year 2040. Studying arthritis and its associated pathologies may help guide health care professionals in practical and effective treatment of the debilitating disease.

Category

Life Sciences

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Apr 17th, 1:40 PM Apr 17th, 2:00 PM

Evidence of Arthritis in a 92-Year-Old Female Cadaveric Specimen

UC 327

Arthritis describes a group of chronic diseases that includes over 100 separate diagnoses, the pathologies of which affect primarily joints and surrounding joint tissue. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that as soon as the year 2040, the number of U.S. adults diagnosed with arthritis will reach 78 million. Osteoarthritis, gout, and rheumatoid arthritis are the most common forms of arthritis; each can lead to permanent and debilitating joint damage, especially within aging populations. It is possible to find evidence of arthritic pathogenesis within the joints of living and cadaveric specimens alike. Here the joint health of a 92-year-old female cadaver is discussed. Several synovial joints of the cadaveric specimen were carefully dissected using both sharp and blunt dissection techniques. Joint cavities at various locations of the hands and feet were opened, and articular surfaces were examined and assessed for evidence of arthritic pathology. Unsurprisingly, signs of osteoarthritis were present in several joints; indications of gouty arthritis were evident in the foot. General loss of articular cartilage, hardening of articular surfaces, and osteophyte formation were noted. Approval to conduct this study was given by the Montana Body Donation Program at Montana State University, and University of Montana IRB approval was not required, as cadavers are not considered human subjects for research purposes. With the size of the aging population in the United States reaching an all-time high, diseases that affect this populace will come to the forefront of healthcare. It is projected that arthritis will affect 26% of American adults by the year 2040. Studying arthritis and its associated pathologies may help guide health care professionals in practical and effective treatment of the debilitating disease.