Presentation Type

Presentation

Abstract

As climate change progresses, vector-borne diseases will spatially spread to novel environmental niches. Among those vector-borne diseases is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF), a tick-borne disease (TBD) that is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia Rickettsii. To predict the spread of RMSF, we modeled future climate scenarios using environmental variables from western Montana. Using this model, we have designed a protocol to enable and promote public awareness of vector-borne diseases. These interventional measures aim to anticipate and decrease disease prevalence through distribution of information about risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options. Our health promotion strategy encompasses two crucial aspects in outreach: first to reinforce healthcare providers and facilitators, and secondly to educate and enable the public to take initiative in regards to their health. Healthcare providers and facilitators will be reinforced through seminars we will design that discuss the interventional methods described above. Public outreach that promotes self-prevention of RMSF will include creating fliers, informational pieces such as articles on the possible spread of RMSF, and educational programs that target students in atrisk areas for RMSF. RMSF in Montana represents a microcosm of a greater climate-driven global threat to human health. This project has global implications because it provides a framework for predicting the spread of vector-borne diseases due to climate change in any country where this issue is applicable. This combined methodology tackles the imminent threat of vector-borne disease to humankind.

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Interdisciplinary (GLI)

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Apr 17th, 11:20 AM Apr 17th, 11:40 AM

Effects of Climate Change on Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and Public Health Implications in Western Montana

UC North Ballroom

As climate change progresses, vector-borne diseases will spatially spread to novel environmental niches. Among those vector-borne diseases is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF), a tick-borne disease (TBD) that is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia Rickettsii. To predict the spread of RMSF, we modeled future climate scenarios using environmental variables from western Montana. Using this model, we have designed a protocol to enable and promote public awareness of vector-borne diseases. These interventional measures aim to anticipate and decrease disease prevalence through distribution of information about risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options. Our health promotion strategy encompasses two crucial aspects in outreach: first to reinforce healthcare providers and facilitators, and secondly to educate and enable the public to take initiative in regards to their health. Healthcare providers and facilitators will be reinforced through seminars we will design that discuss the interventional methods described above. Public outreach that promotes self-prevention of RMSF will include creating fliers, informational pieces such as articles on the possible spread of RMSF, and educational programs that target students in atrisk areas for RMSF. RMSF in Montana represents a microcosm of a greater climate-driven global threat to human health. This project has global implications because it provides a framework for predicting the spread of vector-borne diseases due to climate change in any country where this issue is applicable. This combined methodology tackles the imminent threat of vector-borne disease to humankind.